Guide To The 2019 US Open

Guide To The 2019 US Open

The US Open returns to Pebble Beach this June as one of the most storied and iconic golf courses in the world hosts its sixth edition of the United States Golf Association’s (USGA) showpiece annual event.

The run of monthly majors from April through to the British Open in July has already staged some seriously entertaining golf. The third Major of the season, the 2019 US Open will have to go some to match the drama of Tiger's victory at the Masters and Brooks Koepka's win with a final round wobble at the PGA Championship.

Bet UK’s online betting has the latest golf betting odds for the US Open, as well as all PGA and European tour events. In the lead up to this year’s event, check out resident tipster Robert Cobley’s US Open betting tips for his thoughts and opinions.

2019 US Open Format

Since 1898 the US Open has been a stroke-play event played across four rounds of 72 holes. This year the tournament tees off on June 13th with the final 18-hole Sunday scheduled for Fathers Day.

156 players make up the US Open field with that number cut to 67 after the first two days of play.

The US Open can quite rightly lay claim to being the most difficult to win of all of golf’s four Majors. The set-up is usually stingy with low scoring at a premium. Since 2000 the average winning score of the US Open has been almost six strokes higher than that in each of the other three Majors.

The 2019 Us Open Venue Needs Little Introduction

Pebble Beach Links is one of America’s most recognisable golf courses. Nestled on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula in central California, the 18-hole layout offers stunning views across Still Water Cove with the Pacific Ocean lapping at the shore which borders the course.

Indeed, the ocean is never far away during a round here. The Pacific poses a distinct hazard at six of the holes and threatens to come into play at another three. Such is the ever-present watery threat at Pebble Beach, a recent survey found over 30,000 stray golf balls lying on the sea bed adjacent to the course. Astonishingly, a teenage diver and her father had already retrieved a further 50,000 balls during a two-year period. A clean-up operation is now underway.

Opened in 1919, The US Open returns to Pebble Beach to celebrate the centenary year of the venue. Pebble Beach is also famous for staging the AT&T Pro-Am. The annual mix-up of pro’s and celebrities has been played on the three famous courses on the Monterey Peninsula for over 70 years. The final round is always played on the links layout so several pros took a first look at how Pebble Beach will look at the Open at February's pro-am.

The legendary Tom Watson once said “it takes a lot of heart” to play Pebble Beach Links. The course is notable for being home to some of the smallest greens in professional golf. The green sizes at Pebble Beach are roughly half that found at Oakmont Country Club, site of nine US Opens. In fact, Pebble Beach greens average at a miserly 3,500 square feet compared with 13,600 at the world’s other most famous links course - St Andrews.

Previous US Opens at Pebble Beach

The US Open was first staged at Pebble Beach in 1972. Jack Nicklaus captured his 11th Major with one of the most famous shots in golfing history. With a three-stroke lead, Nicklaus sealed the title with a 1-iron second shot which struck the flagstick square on to secure a tap-in birdie. Nicklaus would later recall that he could never repeat the feat again. When the US Open returned to Pebble Beach six years later, Tom Watson would clinch victory over Nicklaus with a delicate chip-in at the same hole.

US Opens at Pebble Beach have been notable for the challenging weather conditions which have tested the world’s best. Tom Kite won the US Open at Pebble Beach on a windy weekend in 1992 with Tiger Woods claiming his third Major in 2000 as the only player to finish under par in a weather-delayed tournament. Graham McDowell became the first European to win the US Open in forty years when he edged out Grégory Havret by a single stroke in 2010.

Players To Watch At The US Open

Brooks Koepka will enter the fray as the favourite to lift a Championship Trophy which has been presented to the winner of the US Open since its inaugural event in 1895.

The 29-year-old earns his place at the top of the odds following a successful defence of the PGA Championship title last month. Can Koepka defend the US Open title he won at Shinnecock Hills last June and at Erin Hills the previous year? It would be an astonishing feat, and one only achieved once in the tournament’s history - back in 1905 when Scotsman Willie Anderson claimed a trio of consecutive titles.

The likes of Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods and Dustin Johnson head up the rest of the favourites at a venue which has become synonymous with the US Open. Johnson is one of a number of players who have enjoyed success at Pebble Beach along with Phil Mickelson, Jason Day and Jordan Spieth.

How To Watch The 2019 US Open

In the UK, you can watch the US Open on Sky Sports Golf. Pebble Beach local time is eight hours behind BST. Sky's coverage begins at 21.30 on 13th June. Fox Sports will beam the event live in America. If you’re looking for the latest odds on the US open, you can find them right here at Bet UK.

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*All odds from Bet UK’s online betting correct at the time of writing.

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